Monthly Archives: May 2015

Homecoming by Kass Morgan

Homecoming by Kass Morgan, the final book of The Hundred trilogy, opens with dropships full of people from the Colony crash landing on Earth. Unfortunately, Vice Chancellor Rhodes has survived and jumps right in to running things exactly how they were run on the ship. This includes immediately sentencing Bellamy to death. Bellamy, Wells, and Clarke decide to move in with Sasha and the friendly Earthborns and Glass and Luke head out on their own to escape Rhodes’s dictatorship.

As with the other books, Homecoming is written in alternating focus on Wells, Bellamy, Clarke, and Glass. It is the strongest of the three books in the trilogy. There are fewer flashbacks needed (though the Kindle formatting of the flashbacks is awful this time – in the first book they were obvious because they were in italics, in the second book they were are little more difficult because they were just a smaller font size, but in this third book they were terrible because they were barely a smaller font at all so, nearly every time, I had to stop and go back once I realized it was a flashback). I read the entire trilogy in three days because I really didn’t want to put the books down, they were that good. With about 13% left in this last book, I didn’t know how the author was going to tie it all up satisfactorily, but she most definitely did. The ending is perfect, though it was a bit sad getting there. Highly recommended!

5 (out of 5) Stars

Books Read in 2015: 41
Pages Read in 2015: 11,089
Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks (more book reviews!)
Applied to Category for Special Reading Challenge: A trilogy (book 3)

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Day 21 by Kass Morgan

In the second book of The Hundred series, Day 21 by Kass Morgan, the kids on earth are figuring out how to survive while in space the ship is breaking apart and running out of oxygen. Once again, the book is told from alternating focus on Wells, Clarke, Bellamy, and Glass. Wells follows in his father’s footsteps of being a great leader, Clarke discovers what she believes about her parents may not be true at all, Bellamy is focused on getting his sister back from the Earthborns, and Glass realizes almost too late that she needs to get off the dying ship.

Middle books of dystopian trilogies are often just not as good as the other two books, but this is not the case with Day 21. There are fewer flashbacks in this one than in the first book, but the ones included really help gain understanding of the characters’ motivations. I found myself barely able to put the book down because I really wanted to know what would happen next. The last two or three chapters are the best with, like in the first book, some pretty dramatic twists.

4 (out of 5) Stars

Books Read in 2015: 40
Pages Read in 2015: 10,743
Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks (more book reviews!)
Applied to Category for Special Reading Challenge: A trilogy (book 2)

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The 100 by Kass Morgan

Three-hundred years post-cataclysm, there are problems on the spaceship holding all of what is believed to be left of the human race. The ship is breaking down so one-hundred teenage inmates are chosen to be sent to earth to determine if the radiation levels have dropped and if it is once again inhabitable. The chapters alternate between following Bellamy, who forced his way onto the dropship to protect his younger sister, Glass, who escaped just before the dropship left and is still on the main ship, Wells, the Chancellor’s son, who committed a crime in order to be sent to earth with Clarke, and Clarke, who, because she was Confined because of a secret Wells shared, wants nothing to do with him.

Though the writing sometimes leaves something to be desired, The 100 by Kass Morgan is extremely engaging. Sometimes I could not put it down because I wanted to know why the characters did what they did and what got them sent to Confinement and then to earth. The alternating close third person format with flashbacks in many of the chapters works extremely well. This is an excellent start to the trilogy with an incredible cliffhanger in the very last line that makes you want to read the second book immediately!

4 (out of 5) Stars

Books Read in 2015: 39
Pages Read in 2015: 10,426
Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks (more book reviews!)
Applied to Category for Special Reading Challenge: A trilogy (book 1)

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Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer

Thirteen-year-old Theodore Boone may not be a lawyer, but he already acts like one, spending more time at the courthouse than even his lawyer parents. He’s fascinated by the trial of the century and is pretty sure the defendant committed the crime. When an eyewitness tells Theo what he saw, but makes Theo swear he won’t tell anyone else, Theo is in way over his head and needs help.

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer by John Grisham is a simple, but engaging, thriller aimed at middle schoolers. It is well written. The only problem is the end wraps things up very quickly and is predictable by about 2/3 of the way through the book.

4 (out of 5) Stars

Books Read in 2015: 38
Pages Read in 2015: 10,099
Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks (more book reviews!)

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Filed under Middle Grades

Princess Academy: The Forgotten Sisters by Shannon Hale

In this third book in the Princess Academy series by Shannon Hale, The Forgotten Sisters, Miri is sent by the king and queen to hold a princess academy for three sisters, cousins to the king, living in the western province of Lesser Alva. When Miri arrives, desperately missing Peder and her home on Mount Eskel, she finds three destitute girls who spend their time hunting for food while living in a linder house in the middle of a swamp. A corrupt man runs the town and intercepts the monthly allowance sent for the girls from the palace in Asland. In this environment, Miri struggles to prepare the girls for one of them to be married off to the king of a neighboring land in an attempt to prevent a war.

I had high hopes for The Forgotten Sisters and I certainly wasn’t disappointed. When I read Shannon Hale’s books I can picture the action and setting in my mind. I do not have that happen with any other author. The pictures she paints with her words are so beautiful, sometimes I have to stop and think about what I just read and savor it for just a little longer. There were a few twists, turns, and surprises waiting throughout this wonderful book. An excellent book from the first word all the way to the last, truly awesome sentence. Highly recommended!

5 (out of 5) Stars

Books Read in 2015: 37
Pages Read in 2015: 9826
Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks (more book reviews!)
Applied to Category for Special Reading Challenge: A book published this year

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Filed under Middle Grades