20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

An ill-fated hunt for a giant “sea creature” ends with M. Aronnax, Conseil, and Ned Land being taken aboard that creature, Captain Nemo’s Nautilus, an amazing futuristic (for the late 1800s) submarine. The men are told they can do as they please on board, but they must never leave. During the course of their 20,000 league around the world oceanic adventure, they see sea creatures that had only thus far been dreamed about, hunt in an underwater forest, go through an unknown underground pass between the Red and Mediterranean Seas, visit the ruins of Atlantis, get stranded in an iceberg, fight gigantic cuttlefish, attack a ship, and much more.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne was published almost 150 years ago in 1870, but is still interesting today. The ocean floor still holds mysteries for us and the story is just believable enough to make most of it exciting. Verne let his imagination run wild while writing this book in the first person (from the point of view of M. Aronnax) in the style of a travelogue. On occasion it would get technical about the types of fishes and cetaceans. Sometimes the narrative moved extremely slowly and my mind would wander. The second part (each part is split into 23 relatively short chapters) was much more interesting and exciting than the first. The end is satisfactory, yet still leaves you with questions and things to think about.

3 (out of 5) Stars

Books Read in 2014: 116
Pages Read in 2014: 22,313
Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks (more book reviews!)

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1 Comment

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One response to “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

  1. Pingback: Pre-Reading | Smaller on the Outside

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